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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
as edie geiten can are. she could not get the sad thoughts out of her head. >> my mother used to say to me, smile, why don't you smile? and i would -- you know, give something like that maybe or just -- want is there to smile about? >> at 19, the first of three suicide attempts. >> for reasons that are inexplicable to me even now. got up and started playing with a razor. and -- >> you cut your wrists. both your wrists? >> yeah, uh-huh. >> over the next 40 years, she tried counseling, psychiatric drugs, and electroconvulsive shock therapy, but nothing worked. >> the despair, i think, is what is the most powerful push toward suicide. because it feels like there is no hope. >> but if you could look inside edie's head today, this is what you'd see. two electrodes, the thick not of angel hair pasta -- thickness of angel hair pasta, powered by a battery pack. >> i don't think about it, but i have electrodes in my brain. >> an experimental use of deep brain stimulation. what are we looking cincinnati pioneered by neurologists. the target is called area 25. a junction box for the brain circuits th
to overturn the ban. >>> first, "sanjay gupta m.d." begins now. >>> hello and thanks for joining us. on tap today, why the latest push by bill and melinda gates may be setting up this fight with the catholic church. >>> also, confronting the unthinkable. a teenage boy gets cancer, and his father discovers this remarkable source of help. >>> first, under the microscope. a new treatment for depression. a fascinating story. a disease, as you know, that affects more people than coronary heart disease or cancer. good news is that in most cases, it is treatable. medication such as anti-depressants can be effective. in milder cases, cognitive behavioral therapy has been shown to work just as well. unfortunately, for many people, nothing seems to help. and that's why it's exciting to hear about a totally new approach that involves a device that looks like a pacemaker. two wires inserted directly under the brain, and then on the outside, a doctor can literally flip a switch. a pretty radical approach. in some cases, the results are astonishing. for as long as edie geiten can are. she could not get t
of background, this is the part of world that gave us sars, the deadly h5n1 bird flu. almost every deadly strain of bird flu over the years. we started hearing warnings that a deadly new disease, we paid attention. it all started with this dill general doctor noticing something unusual. young patients were coming into his hospital and dying very quickly. within 24 hours. he wrote a letter of warning describing a terrifying picture, a disease that he had never seen before that was nearly 100% lethal. we decided to go to the hospital. it is in the center of the city. >> with the majority have these cases under the age of 3, were seriously ill and many of them had died within 24 hours of admission. >> that's pretty frightening for people to hear. there's a lot of diseases in this part of the world. many parts of the world. to kill that quickly. the back drop is important. the hospital treats thousands of children suffering from dengue fever, every week. this is a part of world where bird flu and sars originated. >> a new picture for us. i've never seen this in cambodia before. >> he is the head of
talk to us about what you saw at that scene and what you've been briefed about based on your own, extensive, personal experience in law enforcement? give us perspective from your department. >> i appreciate that question. so it was certainly a sophisticated device. i don't really want to comment too much further on the sophistication of the device, itself. again, that will be made known by the experts at the lab and then it will be put forward in a court of law. but, yes. i have a lot of overseas experience and a lot of experience responding to critical incidents and i've dealt with improvised explosive devices in many theaters before. this was certainly challenging for all involved. and again, i want to applaud the heroic efforts of that joint bomb squad here. they operate almost, you know, each and every day in a collaborative environment and it just went seamlessly. then we rolled in those national assets. thank you. [ question inaudible ] >> again, there is, unfortunately, quite a bit available on the internet but we don't want to go into any of the tactics and procedures mr.
for us. we've never seen this before -- >> he's the head of the hospital and allowed us into the icu where the patients were treated. give to see give you an idea of how busy this is, as we were talking, did richter got called because another child needed help. dr. richter said 66 children came to the hospital with the mystery illness. for 64 of them, it was 24 hours of hell before they died. you heard right -- all but two died. [ crying ] >> in many of these children, it started off rather mild. a mild fever. but then things progressed quickly from there. for example, in this 2-year-old's case, we don't know what's causing his encephalitis. but this is typically what happens. the fontenell start to bulge and the eyes become disconginate, as well, going from the head to the brain to the lungs. >> you see this, 842, and five hours later, his lungs -- >> in the last few hours of life, this unknown illness completely destroyed the child's lungs. and there was no way to stop it. never seen anything like this before. >> no. this is a first time at the end of april. and this make us worry.
originated. >> a new picture for us. i've never seen this in cambodia before. >> he is the head of the hospital and he allowed us into the icu where the patients are treated. >> to give you an idea how busy this is, even while we were talking. >> he said 66 children came to this hospital with the mystery illness. for 64 of them, it was 24 hours of hell before they died. you heard right. all but two died. in many of these children it started off rather mild. a mild fever. then things progress quickly from there. for example, in this child's case who is 2 years old, we don't know what is causing his encephalitis but this is typically what happens. it starts to bulk and the eyes as you can see, as well. from there it become mercy less. it goes from the head to the lungs. >> you see the lungs. five hours later. >> the last few hours of life, this unknown illness completely destroyed the child's lungs. and there was no way to stop it. >> never seen anything like this before. >> no. this is the first time at the end of april. and this makes us worried. >> something calledentero virus
>>> hello and thanks for joining us. the international aids conference kicks off this weekend, and believe it or not, people are actually talking about a cure for aids. we're going to dig deeper into that. >>> plus, stopping the stares. young burn victims taunted at school. you're going to meet a woman who says she has a way to help. >>> first, you know, it's hard for me to believe that doctors in this country ever have to deny patients care just because they can't get them the medicine they need. but they do. drug shortages have hit cancer patients particularly hard. last year alone, doctors told more than a half a million cancer patients the treatments they needed simply weren't available. that leaves doctors scrambling for alternatives and a lot of patients in limbo. patients like renee mosher. i met her last year, she had an aggressive form of ovarian cancer and couldn't get the chemotherapy medication she desperately needed. >> you know, you feel like you're in a fight with one hand tied behind your back. we just at the time said let's go with what we have and see what ha
. dozens were killed. nearly 60 injured in one of the worst mass shootings in u.s. history. the suspected shooter, james holmes, was until this june a graduate student at the university of colorado in a highly demanding neuroscience program. people have been talking about, asking me -- do you know had was happening inside his brain, in his mind? and also, if a colleague or a family member were ever going to possibly pose a danger, would you know it? what would you do about it? clinical psychologist half area amadour is author of "i am not sick, i don't need help: how to help someone with mental illness accept treatment." thanks for joining us. i appreciate your time. >> glad to be here. >> i do want to talk about, you know, what some of the warning signs might be in, you know, family members or colleagues. but first, there's a lot of mystery surrounding james holmes still. james holmes. the university of colorado said very little -- all we know is that he left his neuroscience program in june. he did badly on an oral exam apparently, but was not forced out of school. the school told the s
queiter, deputy of the fda center for research office for new drugs. thanks for joining us. you've been listening in on this conversation. i assume it's not the first time you've heard a conversation like this. renee mosher, she was here last november. she couldn't get the medication she needed, doxil. she passed away. her oncologist think it's in part because of not getting that medication. people say this problem is getting worse. the shortages won't be resolved for some time to come. first of all, is that true? >> i think -- made a couple of statements there. i think that there is no quick fix for this shortage problem. there's absolutely no quick fix. and you're right, dr. gupta, i have heard this story many, many times as a practicing physician myself. i've experienced it. i have friends who have experienced it. not just in the sphere of oncology but in other areas of medicine, as well. particularly in the anesthesia and pain medicine community. this is a crisis. >> you know, one of the things that people ask immediately is why and why is this happening now. there was a recent repo
up next however dr. sanjay gupta md. >>> hello. thanks for being with us. on tap today a story that really hit home for me. as a father of three girls. i'm going to tell you about one little girl who was bullied at school so badly she had plastic surgery to stop the bullies. we'll meet her. >>> but first, it's been one week since a 24-year-old man went on a shooting rampage inside a colorado movie theater. a dozen people were killed and nearly 60 more injured in one of the worst mass shootings in u.s. history. the suspected shooter james holmes was until this june a graduate student at the university of colorado and a highly demanding neuro science program. a lot of people have been asking me, do you know what was happening inside his brain, in his mind? and also if a colleague or family member were ever going to possibly pose a danger, would you know it? what would you do about it? clinical psychologist javier amador is the author of "i am not sick i don't need help." thanks for joining us. i do want to talk about what some of the warning signs might be. there is a lot of myst
, this is the part of the world that gave us sars, nipa virus, the deadly bird flu. in fact almost every new strain of influenza over the years. as we heard of a deadly new disease, we paid attention. it started with this diligent doctor noticing something unusual -- young patients were coming into his hospital and dying very quickly, within 24 hours. he wrote a letter of warning describing a terrifying picture -- a disease that he'd never seen before that was nearly 100% lethal. so we decided to go to the hospital in the center of the city. >> the majority of these cases, mostly under the age of 3, were seriously ill. and many of them had died within 24 hours of admission. >> that's frightening, i think, for people to hear. >> absolutely. >> there's a lot of diseases in this part of the world. many parts of the world. but that kill that quickly -- the backdrop is important here. the hospital treats thousands of children suffering from dang a fever, malaria, and tuberculosis every week. and remember, this is a part of the world where bird flu and sars originated. still, right away, dr. richner knew
things like, you know, i don't really want to talk about this, but i think the cia has got us under surveillance. you know, my eyes and other people's eyes get wide. at least what i used to do. and we try to reassure the person. instead, pardon the expression, but i learned, frankly, to shut up and listen. you don't have to agree with the person. you shouldn't lie and agree with the person. just don't jump to looking incredulous or doubtful or judging what they're telling you. and what you'll find is they'll open up. and it's really vitally important that people who are experiencing these psychotic symptoms have someone they can open up to. otherwise, they're alone with their delusions. if they're having voices, they're alone with their hallucinations and whatever those hallucinations and delusions are telling them reality is and what they should do. >> people don't think about it as concretely, i think, as you've put it. i think it's, again, a very important message to hear. hope to have you back. you know, these are tough topics to talk about. i think important to a lot of familie
>>> hello and thanks for joining us. an importance week. i'm outside bellview hospital, the oldest and one of the largest public hospitals in new york city. you know what, i'm here to try and answer your questions about change that are coming to your medical care and your insurance. this is something that affects all of us. it's been a monumental week. i've watched everything unfold certainly as a journalist but also as a doctor. and even after all the bitter fighting over the president's health care law, we had to wait to see if the supreme court would give its seal of approval. we now know this week it did. the court upheld the law. you've been sending me questions about what that all means for you. i'm going to try and answer as many of them as i can. here's my promise -- by the end of this half-hour, you will understand all of this better than you do now. first, i want to take a moment just to put everything in perspective for a second. whether you support this decision or not, this is a huge deal. this law now means that all americans should have access to health insurance cov
someone qualifies. used to be 100% of poverty level. now it will go up to 133% of poverty level. someone like jalil -- i don't know what his family situation is. but if you're making $14,000 or less roughly, he should qualify for medicaid. in short, the answer to the question is that it shouldn't make a difference really at all. he qualifies now. he should still be able to qualify after it goes into effect. >> the $14,000 for a single person or family? >> for a system person. for a -- single person. for a family, it's closer to $29,000 or $30,000. the number will change closer to 2014. but 133% of poverty level. >> another viewer on the phone now, delee. she's 56, a diabetic. and she recently lost her job. i think she's on the phone. she has a question for you. >> hey. >> hi, sanjay. i qualify for cobra, but my monthly payment is near $600 which is more than half of my unemployment. i can afford it right now. i don't know how long i'll be able to afford it, though, depending on how long i'm out of work. how is the new law going to help people who are paying those kind of rates? i mean, i
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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